German U-Boat



U-995 Type VIIC Gallery DVD

Military Online Colleges


Mailing List
Signup for our free
newsletter
to
receive news on
U-Boat updates.

Email:
Home » U-Boat Types » Type II

Type II U-Boat

Deck and Conning Tower
Stern Stern Quarters Electric Engine Room Diesel Engine Room Control Room Radio Room Bow Quarters Torpedo Room Bow

First launched in June 1935, the Type II were the first U-boats commissioned in German yards after the repudiation of the Versailles Treaty. Unknown to other nations at that time, Germany had already begun construction for 12 new Type II U-boats as early as 1934. It was not until the signing of the Anglo-German Naval Agreement in February 1935 that construction began to be undertaken publicly. By June 15 1935, the first class of the Type II was launched.



U-995 German Type VIIC U-Boat Illustrated Gallery
Explore the last surviving German Type VIIC U-boat with over 600 Walkaround photos, videos, schematic plans, authentic sounds and a virtual tour. For modelers, researchers, and u-boat fans. Click here now.

Authored by Uboataces
U-995 U-boat

Small and cramped, the Type II were coastal boats intended principally for training, but because of the shortage of available boats, they were later relegated to war duties. With a crew of 25, the boats had limited range and carried enough provisions for three to four weeks, but frequently returned to port after expending their supply of torpedoes.

Due to their small size and heavy rolling on the sea, the Type IIs quickly earned the nickname “Dugout Canoes”. Although of limited use in the open ocean, some remarkable successes were accomplished early in the war by U-boat aces such as Otto Kretschmer. The Type II also earned the respect and admiration of the crew due to its high maneuverability, rapid diving time and durability. Later in the war, due to the ever increasing need for training new crews, all Type II U-boats were withdrawn from combat duties and assigned to full-time training.

A total of 50 Type II U-boats were built during the war. There are four variants, Type IIA, IIB, IIC and IID.


Type IIA

Type IIA

The Type IIA was a single hull, all welded boat with internal ballast tanks. Compared to the other variants, it had a smaller bridge and could carry the German G7a, G7e torpedoes as well as TM-type torpedo mines. There was a single periscope in the conning tower with serrated net cutters in the bow. The net cutters were adopted from World War 1 boats but were quickly discontinued during World War 2.

Type IIB

Type IIB

The Type IIB was a lengthened version of the Type IIA. Three additional compartments were inserted amidships which were fitted with additional diesel tanks beneath the control room. The range was increased to 1,800 nautical miles at 12 knots. Diving time was also improved to 30 seconds.

Type IIC

Type IIC

The Type IIC was a further lengthened version of the Type IIB with an additional two compartments inserted amidships to accomodate improved radio room facilities and a second periscope. The additional diesel tanks beneath the control room was further enlarged, extending the range to 1,900 nautical miles at 12 knots.

Type IID

Type IID

The Type IID had additional saddle tanks fitted to the sides of the external hull. These saddle tanks were used to accomodate additional diesel storage tanks. The diesel oil would float atop the saddle tanks and as the oil is consumed, sea water would gradually fill the tanks to compensate for the positive buoyancy. The range was nearly doubled to 3,450 nautical miles at 12 knots and enabled the Type II to operate around the British Isles. A further development was the propellers were fitted with Kurt nozzles, intended to improve propulsion efficiency.

Technical Specification

Type IIA Type IIB Type IIC Type IID
Role Coastal U-boat Coastal U-boat Coastal U-boat Coastal U-boat
Displacement
Surfaced
Submerged

253.8 tons
301.1 tons

278.9 tons
328.5 tons

291 tons
341 tons

314 tons
364 tons
Dimensions
Length
Beam
Draught

134.2ft (40.9m)
13.4ft (4.1m)
12.5ft (3.8m)

140.1ft (42.7m)
13.4ft (4.1m)
12.8ft (3.9m)

144.0ft (43.9m)
13.5ft (4.1m)
12.5ft (3.8m)

144.4ft (44.0m)
16.4ft (5.0m)
12.8ft (3.9m)
Top speed
Surfaced
Submerged

13.0 knots
6.9 knots

13.0 knots
7.0 knots

12.0 knots
7.0 knots

12.7 knots
7.4 knots
Maximum range
Surfaced
Surfaced
Submerged
Submerged

1,050nm at 12kt
2,000nm at 8kt
35nm at 4kt
71nm at 2kt

1,800nm at 12kt
3,900nm at 8kt
35nm at 4kt
71nm at 2kt

1,900nm at 12kt
4,200nm at 8kt
35nm at 4kt
71nm at 2kt

3,200nm at 12kt
5,680nm at 8kt
56nm at 4kt
 
Crush depth
Crash dive time
328ft (100m)
35secs
328ft (100m)
30secs
328ft (100m)
25secs
328ft (100m)
25secs
Weapons
Bow tubes
Stern tubes
Torpedo capacity
Mines
Guns
Ammunition

Three 21 inch
None
Six
TMA, TMB
20mm Twin Flak
850 rounds

Three 21 inch
None
Six
TMA, TMB
20mm Twin Flak
1,000 rounds

Three 21 inch
None
Six
TMA, TMB
20mm Twin Flak
1,000 rounds

Three 21 inch
None
Six
TMA, TMB
20mm Twin Flak
1,000 rounds
Officers and crew 3 + 22 = 25 3 + 22 = 25 3 + 22 = 25 3 + 22 = 25
Total built 6 20 8 16
First launch June 15, 1935 June 29, 1935 Sept 3, 1939 May 18, 1940




U-995 German Type VIIC U-Boat


Directory
Battle of The Atlantic   Historical Battles   U-Boat Tactics   U-Boat Personalities   Medals & Awards  
Photo Gallery   Video Library   Articles   U-Boat Types   Midget Submarines   U-Boat Weapons   U-Boat Equipment  
Bridge Conversion   U-Boat Crew   U-Boat Insignia   U-Boat Marches   U-Boat Sounds   U-Boat Scale Models  
Links Directory   Contact Us   Our Awards   Guestbook  
Copyright 2005-2012 © Uboataces. All rights reserved.